Supervisor to host meeting on Mountain Valley Pipeline


Overall Pipeline

Supervisor to host meeting on Mountain Valley Pipeline

Pittsylvania County Board of Supervisors member Jerry Hagerman will host a community information meeting on the proposed Mountain Valley natural gas pipeline Saturday, Nov. 29, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Gretna Volunteer Fire Department.

Hagerman, who represents the Callands-Gretna District, said Norfolk attorney Joseph T. Waldo will discuss and answer questions about landowners’ rights.

Hagerman met Waldo, who specializes in property rights and eminent domain, at a Preserve the New River Valley meeting on the pipeline in Blacksburg and invited the attorney to speak in Gretna.

“Several people have called me wanting more information about the pipeline,” Hagerman said. “A lot of the questions, I didn’t really feel qualified to answer.”

The supervisor said landowners want to know how much compensation they can expect and what their rights if they don’t want the pipeline on their property.

Hagerman said he hasn’t contacted Mountain Valley Pipeline representatives, but the company is welcome to attend the meeting.

EQT Corp. and NextEra Energy, which plan to build the 300-mile pipeline, have scheduled a community open house Monday, Dec. 15, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Hampton Inn on McBride Lane in Gretna.

The public will have an opportunity to ask questions and talk with project team members about the pipeline.

EQT and NextEra announced plans for the pipeline earlier this year and are seeking approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

The pipeline would run from Wetzel County, W. Va., through southwest Virginia to Pittsylvania County and connect with Williams’ Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Company’s compressor station in Chatham.

Estimated to cost $3 billion to $3.5 billion, the pipeline would pass through Giles, Montgomery, Roanoke, Franklin, and Pittsylvania counties.

Community meetings also are scheduled Dec. 16 at the Harvester Performance Center in Rocky Mount, Dec. 17 at Salem Civic Center, and Dec. 18 in Blacksburg.

Additional open houses will be scheduled in January 2015, the companies said.

Natalie Cox, a spokesman with EQT in Pittsburgh, Pa., said the project includes 15 to 20 miles of pipeline in the county and will affect about 120 landowners.

For more information, visit mountainvalleypipeline.info or call 844-MVP-Talk.
tim.davis@chathamstartribune.com
http://www.chathamstartribune.com/news/article_e6a5b5b0-74b2-11e4-a5c8-c7028c37fee8.html?mode=print
434-432-2791

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with Clark Mercer, Mark Brandon, Mara Eve Robbins, Bridget Kelley-Dearing, Candy Graham & over 200 people ‪#‎vacleanpower

 

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Pipelines Problems

5 hrs ·
"A new analysis of federal records reveals that in just the past year and four months, there have been 372 oil and gas pipeline leaks, spills and other incidents, leading to 20 deaths, 117 injuries and more than $256 million in damages.
The new data adds to a June 1, 2013 independent analysis of federal records revealing that since 1986, oil and gas pipeline incidents have resulted in 532 deaths, more than 2,400 injuries and more than $7.5 billion in damages."
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/…/pipeline-accidents_b_617408…

Pipelines and prejudice / Meetings: Joseph Waldo, an eminent domain attorney with Waldo & Lyle in Norfolk, will speak during a public meeting at 6 p.m. Nov. 29 at Gretna Volunteer Fire Department./Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC will hold an open house in Gretna. The event will be held 5:30 to 8 p.m. Dec. 15 at the Hampton Inn.




Comments from KM:  Please note the two meetings below. Mapping of the proposed pipeline can be found here http://mountainvalleypipeline.info/maps/ Some parcels in Pittsylvania Co. are owned by folks who don't live here. One parcel has an expired uranium lease.
 
Citizens are challenging 56-49.01 Code of Virginia. 56-49.01 is a law that imposes a presumption of eminent domain before FERC has even started the process of approving the pipeline. Citizens are also questioning whether the pipeline fits "public convenience and necessity" criteria since fracked gas is a commodity which will be exported.
 
Citizens are attending public meetings in which their principal message is "we will help you hold out for the highest dollar during condemnation." That's not really what most people want to hear. They want to hear "we will help you stop this thing in court".
 
Meanwhile, MVP is allowing some municipalities to believe they can tap into the transmission line. The infrastructure does not exist for this to occur. Would this necessitate additional pipelines and more property takings? Additional infrastructure would likely follow an existing energy corridor. Is your property on or near an energy corridor? If so, you need to pay attention as MVP and other big money ventures plow through private properties.
 
What is an energy corridor? Energy corridors may accommodate multiple pipelines (such as for oil, gas, or hydrogen), electricity transmission lines, and related infrastructure, such as access and maintenance roads, compressors, pumping stations, and other structures. So, once a pipeline is on your property, you are an "energy corridor". (Now I have skin in this game.) Expect future takings of your property. One energy corridor guide outlines the benefits energy corridor designation brings. Do you see any benefits to the landowner whose property is designated as an energy corridor?
  • Streamlining and expediting the processing of energy-related permits and projects;
  • Providing applicants for individual rights-of-way within designated corridors with a clear set of actions required by each of the Agencies to implement projects in designated corridors;
  • Reducing duplicative assessment of generic environmental impacts by focusing further impact assessment on site-specific (on-the-ground) environmental studies to determine route suitability and appropriate mitigation;
  • Ensuring needed inter-agency coordination as part of the application process; and
  • Encouraging new and innovative technologies to increase corridor capacity.
We need an energy policy in America which does not pit industry (with aid of government) against citizen. Is it possible? Of course it is. It's not happening because we're not demanding it. It's time to start.
 
 Proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline meetings planned in Gretna
 
 
John R. Crane | Danville Register& Beeroanoke.com
An attorney will give a presentation in Gretna on property rights issues surrounding the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline, while the company that seeks to build the 300-mile pipeline will hold an open house of its own in Gretna.
Joseph Waldo, an eminent domain attorney with Waldo & Lyle in Norfolk, will speak during a public meeting at 6 p.m. Nov. 29 at Gretna Volunteer Fire Department.
Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC will hold an open house in Gretna. The event will be held 5:30 to 8 p.m. Dec. 15 at the Hampton Inn.
Waldo represents property owners defending themselves against eminent domain, a tactic sometimes used by companies to establish rights-of-way across landowners’ properties.
Many property owners believe they are powerless when Fortune 500 gas companies want to take their land for projects, Waldo said.
“We show them exactly the opposite, how they can fight them and protect their property rights,” Waldo said.
Companies that send right-of-way agents to homes, farms and businesses are there to acquire that property, Waldo said, not to represent the company .
“When they [property owners] understand their rights and they do their homework, then they’re not going to be taken advantage of,” Waldo said.
Posted: Friday, November 21, 2014 7:07 am
PEARISBURG — The occasional catcall, ringing loud and clear in the high school’s cavernous auditorium, ultimately pushed the chairwoman of the Giles County Board of Supervisors to chide the crowd for being rude.
Nearly 300 people turned out Thursday night in Pearisburg to listen and ask questions when two executives from the companies proposing to build the controversial Mountain Valley Pipeline met with supervisors at Giles High School.
A host of questions focused on the route of the natural gas pipeline and its potential impact on the environment, property values, tourism, safety, wells, historic and cultural resources and more. The pipeline representatives responded with varying degrees of specificity, ranging from detailed to what many in the audience considered vague or evasive.
As proposed, the 300-mile-long Mountain Valley Pipeline, a joint venture of EQT Corp. and NextEra Energy, would travel through West Virginia and cross into Virginia through Giles County. The pipeline would then travel through Montgomery, Roanoke and Franklin counties before connecting with the Transco transmission pipeline in Pittsylvania County.
The 42-inch-diameter buried high-pressure pipeline would transport natural gas that has been extracted through hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” from Marcellus and Utica shale formations in West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Ohio.
Christopher Sherman, a director of regulatory and legislative affairs for NextEra Energy, and Maurice Royster, manager of government relations for EQT Corp., were the pipeline representatives on hand Thursday night.
The pipeline’s current route would traverse roughly 19 miles in Giles County. About a dozen of those miles would follow a corridor for a high-voltage transmission power line.
One questioner asked whether it would be possible for the pipeline to share the transmission line’s existing right-of-way. Sherman said such co-location will be considered but said the pipeline would likely be adjacent to the existing power line rather than beneath it.
John Shepelwich, a spokesman for Appalachian Power Co., has said the proposed pipeline route seems to parallel the right-of-way for the electric utility’s existing Glen Lyn-Hancock transmission power line. Shepelwich said there has been some initial contact between Mountain Valley and Appalachian Power’s transmission engineers. He said his understanding has been that those discussions were essentially a heads-up that Mountain Valley would be in touch about a possible co-location.
“We’re going to have a lot of analysis to do,” Shepelwich said, to determine whether such a co-location of a high-pressure natural gas pipeline and high-voltage power line is feasible and safe.
He said Appalachian would also need to know that the utility could still access its existing right-of-way with heavy equipment if the need arose.
Sherman emphasized repeatedly that the current pipeline route will likely be refined as sensitive environmental areas and historic and culture resources are identified. He said survey crews are beginning to flag a 300-foot study corridor for the route.
“This project is really in its infancy,” he said. “If this was a baseball game, we’d be in the first inning.”
More than one questioner asked whether the region’s geology, including karst terrain, would present unique problems. Sherman said it would not.
According to the U.S. Geological Survey, karst terrain features “distinctive landforms and hydrology created from the dissolution of soluble rocks, principally limestone and dolomite.” Karst terrain is characterized by springs, caves, sinkholes “and a unique hydrogeology that results in aquifers that are highly productive but extremely vulnerable to contamination.”
Famous karst areas in the U.S., where about 20 percent of the land surface is classified as karst, include Mammoth Cave in Kentucky, the USGS reported.
Mountain Valley has noted that existing natural gas pipelines in the region, including the East Tennessee Natural Gas Pipeline and the Columbia Gas Pipeline, operate in areas of karst terrain. Both of those pipelines have provided natural gas to Roanoke Gas.
The pipeline would cross the Appalachian Trail in Giles County. On Wednesday, the board of trustees of the Blue Ridge Land Conservancy voted to oppose the construction of natural gas pipelines that would cross the Appalachian Trail and pass through national parks and parkways, including the Blue Ridge Parkway, federal wilderness areas and lands protected by conservation agreements.
When asked Thursday night about the impact on property values of hosting the Mountain Valley Pipeline, Sherman replied that there would essentially be no negative impact, a response that wrung jeers from the crowd.
Earlier this week, Joe Waldo, a lawyer considered an expert on eminent domain, said pipeline companies typically contend that research supports the position described by Sherman. That research is biased and flawed, Waldo said, observing that just compensation for property should include both its market value and the negative impact on property value.
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will ultimately determine whether the Mountain Valley Pipeline should be built. Sherman said there is clearly adequate demand and supply of natural gas to justify the pipeline’s construction. He said the abundance of natural gas is boosting the nation’s economy and contributing to the revitalization of American manufacturing.
Sherman said Mountain Valley’s goal will be to make the pipeline as benign as possible, a comment that elicited a catcall. “Why don’t you put it by your house?” one woman yelled.
A separate shout, apparently targeted at Sherman and Royster, asked, “How do you sleep at night?”
Later, when Barbara Hobbs, chairwoman of the board of supervisors, sought to close the meeting, one man in the crowd stood defiantly and said his question had not been answered.
Howdy Henritz, a resident of nearby Monroe County, West Virginia, said the pipeline executives had avoided his question once before. Henritz said he wanted to know how Mountain Valley would respond if his spring and well were contaminated during construction or operation of the pipeline.
“Our philosophy is, ‘If we break it, we fix it,’ ” Royster replied.
“How?” Henritz asked.
The question hung in the air as the crowd filed out.

Eminent Domain



Comments from KM:  Didn't Virginian overwhelmingly address this eminent domain in 2012?

 Question: "Shall Section 11 of Article I (Bill of Rights) of the Constitution of Virginia be amended to require that eminent domain powers only be exercised for public uses and not for private gain, private benefit, private enterprise, increasing jobs, increasing tax revenue or economic development; and amended to define what is to be included in determining just compensation for permissible takings and to prevent the taking of more private property than is necessary for the state public use?
 
Why are pipeline industries able to exercise eminent domain? I am told it is because of 56-49.01 Code of Virginia, enacted in 2004. Doesn't the Constitutional amendment trump the 2004 legislation?
 
How did 56-49.01 become law? Does it's patron and and those who brought it from committee (Commerce and Labor in 2004) continue to defend it?
 
Ask them. Some still serve in the General Assembly and according to VPAP* appear to have collected a couple of million dollars from energy and natural resource patrons. VPAP does not list "money in" earlier than 1996. As you can see, some legislators predate this by as much as 20 years.
 
To the best of my knowledge, these are the legislators who served on the C&L committee in 2004 http://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?041+com+S02
 
I'm uncertain why only 13 voted.

 Patron of SB 663 Natural gas companies; right of entry upon property 2004 Wagner (2001-2014 $187,852 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)

 Commerce and Labor 2004
Wampler
Colgan has been serving since 1976 (1996-2014 $115,385 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Saslaw 1976-80 as Delegate, Senate 1980-2014 (1996-2014 $597,315 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Chichester
Miller
Normant (1992-2014 $461,666 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Stosch Delegate from 1983-1992, Senate 1992-2014 (1996-2014 $378,531 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Stolle (2010-2014 $14,500 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Potts
Edwards (1996-2014 $97,091 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Williams
Watkins Delegate 1988-98, Senate 1998-2014 (1996-2014 $270,576 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Wagner (2001-2014 $204,906, from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Newman Delegate 1991-96, Senate 1996-2014 (1996-2014 $86,345 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Rerras
YEAS--Wampler, Colgan, Chichester, Miller, Norment, Stosch, Stolle, Edwards, Williams, Watkins, Wagner, Newman, Rerras--13.

Wampler (Chairman), Colgan, Saslaw, Chichester, Miller, Norment, Stosch, Stolle, Potts, Edwards, Williams, Watkins, Wagner, Newman, Rerras
 
 

Meeting: Mountain Valley natural gas pipeline : Dec. 15, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Hampton Inn on McBride Lane in Gretna.

Overall Pipeline


Meeting:  Mountain Valley natural gas pipeline :   Dec. 15, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Hampton Inn on McBride Lane in Gretna.

Pipeline meeting planned

By TIM DAVIS
Star-Tribune Editor | Posted: Wednesday, November 19, 2014 9:22 am 

            
Pittsylvania County residents can learn more about the proposed Mountain Valley natural gas pipeline at a community open house Monday, Dec. 15, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Hampton Inn on McBride Lane in Gretna.

The public will have an opportunity to ask questions and talk with project team members about the 300-mile pipeline.

EQT Corp. and NextEra Energy announced plans for the pipeline earlier this year and are seeking approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

The pipeline would run from Wetzel County, W. Va., through southwest Virginia to Pittsylvania County and connect with Williams’ Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Company’s compressor station in Chatham.

Estimated to cost $3 billion to $3.5 billion, the pipeline would pass through Giles, Montgomery, Roanoke, Franklin, and Pittsylvania counties.

Community meetings also are scheduled Dec. 16 at the Harvester Performance Center in Rocky Mount, Dec. 17 at Salem Civic Center, and Dec. 18 in Blacksburg.

Additional open houses will be scheduled in January 2015, the companies said.

Natalie Cox, a spokesman with EQT in Pittsburgh, Pa., said the project includes 15 to 20 miles of pipeline in the county and will affect about 120 landowners.

She said company representatives are looking forward to starting a dialogue with property owners.

“We work very hard to develop a relationship with landowners,” Cox said. “We’re here to answer their questions. We encourage a two-way dialogue.”

Cox said Mountain Valley is seeking permission to walk properties and stake the proposed pipeline route. A final route is expected next spring.

Coates Field Services in Beckley, W.Va., is doing the fieldwork. Cox said representatives carry Mountain Valley Pipeline identification.

Cox said the pipeline will use as many existing utility transmission corridors as possible and try to avoid environmentally sensitive areas.

FERC review and approval takes 10 to 12 months.

Construction of the 36-inch to 42-inch diameter steel pipeline is scheduled to begin in late 2016 and will take two years.

The pipeline, which will buried at least three feet underground, will require approximately 75 feet of permanent easement and 125 feet of total easement for temporary work space.

Property owners are entitled to fair compensation for having the pipeline on their land, and the companies said eminent domain — a legal taking of land — is a last resort.

Company officials said the pipeline will be equipped with remote-controlled shut-off valves and will be monitored 24 hours a day through EQT’s gas control center.

Scheduled to go into service in late 2018, the pipeline will deliver 2 billion cubic feet of natural gas per day from the Marcellus and Utica natural gas supplies to markets in the southeastern United States.

Chris Sherman, a representative of EQT and NextEra, outlined the pipeline project at a Pittsylvania County Board of Supervisors meeting in October.

Supervisors had plenty of questions.

Westover District Supervisor Coy Harville wanted to know how many local jobs the pipeline will bring.

“I don’t hear anything where you will create jobs in Pittsylvania County,” the supervisor said.
Sherman said the pipeline is expected to create 3,000 jobs in Virginia, mostly during construction, and the companies try to use local labor when available.
Harville asked for proof.

Staunton River District Supervisor Elton Blackstock wondered whether the pipeline would supply natural gas for economic development in the county.

He suggested running the pipeline down Route 40 from Rocky Mount to Gretna and along U.S. 29 to Chatham.

Transco’s natural gas pipeline, built in the late 1940s, cuts through the heart of the county, but provides no local natural gas distribution.

“I think its paramount we don’t make the mistakes we made in the past,” Blackstock said.

“With the amount of natural gas coming in this county, there’s no reason why we shouldn’t have access. We need to hold their feet to the fire and get on top of this.”

Sherman said local access points are possible along the pipeline, especially if installed during construction.

Once the high-pressure pipeline is in operation it becomes more difficult and expensive to tap into the line, he said.

For more information, visit mountainvalleypipeline.info or call 844-MVP-Talk.
tim.davis@chathamstartribune.com
434-432-2791

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#inbox/149c5b119422442b

Meeting: Ag Developement Board/ Lawyer gives Montgomery Co. landowners advice about pipeline: Meeting: Mountain Valley Pipeline are scheduled to meet Thursday at 6:30 p.m. with Giles County’s board of supervisors at Giles High School in Pearisburg






Meeting:  Ag Development Board  
Thursday, November 20th, 7:00 pm
Address: 19783 US Highway 29 South, Suite G, Chatham, VA

Chairmans Meeting Agenda
 
I. Call to Order

II. Committee Comments and Recommendations
a. Setback Committee - Mr. Roger Jefferson
b. Education Committee – Mrs. Rebecca Mahan
c. Farmers’ Market Committee – Mr. Rusty East
d. New Intensive Ag Committee – Mr. Jay Calhoun
e. Ag Incubator Committee – Mr. Jay Calhoun
f. Transportation Committee – Chad Shelton

III. Other
a. Nominating Committee Reports
IV. Executive Session
V. Adjourn span
 
 



Lawyer gives Montgomery Co. landowners advice about pipeline

Comments:  We may dislike EQT and NextEra's tactics...but who gave them the power to "TAKE" your land?  (see article below.)  Your elected officials profit from such tactics:
 
How did 56-49.01 become law? Does it's patron and and those who brought it from committee (Commerce and Labor in 2004) continue to defend it?

Ask them. Some still serve in the General Assembly and according to VPAP* appear to have collected a couple of million dollars from energy and natural resource patrons.

 VPAP does not list "money in" earlier than 1996. As you can see, some legislators predate this by as much as 20 years.

To the best of my knowledge, these are the legislators who served on the C&L committee in 2004 http://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?041+com+S02

I'm uncertain why only 13 voted.

Patron of SB 663 Natural gas companies; right of entry upon property 2004 Wagner (2001-2014 $187,852 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)

Commerce and Labor 2004
Wampler
Colgan has been serving since 1976 (1996-2014 $115,385 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Saslaw 1976-80 as Delegate, Senate 1980-2014 (1996-2014 $597,315 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Chichester
Miller
Normant (1992-2014 $461,666 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Stosch Delegate from 1983-1992, Senate 1992-2014 (1996-2014 $378,531 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Stolle (2010-2014 $14,500 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Potts
Edwards (1996-2014 $97,091 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Williams
Watkins Delegate 1988-98, Senate 1998-2014 (1996-2014 $270,576 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Wagner (2001-2014 $204,906, from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)

Newman Delegate 1991-96, Senate 1996-2014 (1996-2014 $86,345 from Energy and Natural Resources patrons*)
Rerras
YEAS--Wampler, Colgan, Chichester, Miller, Norment, Stosch, Stolle, Edwards, Williams, Watkins, Wagner, Newman, Rerras--13.
 
 
Posted: Monday, November 17, 2014 10:20 pm
By Duncan Adamsduncan.adams@roanoke.com981-3324roanoke.com

Post your property with “no trespassing” signs. Demand identification when the surveyors show up without permission. Take names. Document. Shoot photos or video. But leave the shotgun in the house. If necessary, swear out a warrant for trespassing.

And, later, when the pipeline company makes an offer to buy an easement across your property, be prepared to ask for a jury trial in federal court to try to ensure your compensation is just and accurately reflective of the damages to the value of the property as a whole.

These recommendations were shared Monday night by Joe Waldo, a lawyer whose Norfolk-based firm focuses solely on representing people facing the prospect of losing some or all of their property to eminent domain.
 
Waldo did not actually say “knowledge is power,” a quote attributed to Francis Bacon, but he might as well have.
 
About 300 people turned out in Blacksburg to hear Waldo and two other lawyers from the firm of Waldo & Lyle — Chuck Lollar and Joe Sherman — share their expertise. The meeting was held at a rented catering hall.
 
“When you leave here tonight, you are going to feel empowered,” Waldo said.
 
Empowered but not necessarily invulnerable. If the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approves the pipeline project, “it is a done deal,” Waldo said.
 
He acknowledged, in response to a question, that pipeline opponents might be able to make the case to FERC that the pipeline will not serve a public purpose in Virginia if the bulk of the gas it transports is sold in out-of-state markets or exported.
 
Many people in the crowd Monday night had been contacted in recent weeks and months by a right-of-way acquisition contractor working for Mountain Valley Pipeline LLC, seeking permission to study and survey their property as a potential pipeline host.
 
Waldo was invited to speak by Preserve the New River Valley, one of several regional citizens groups opposing the pipeline.
 
As proposed, the 300-mile-long Mountain Valley Pipeline, a joint venture of EQT Corp. and Next-Era Energy, would travel through West Virginia and five counties in Virginia on its way to connect with the Transco transmission pipeline in Pittsylvania County. The other Virginia counties that would be affected include Giles, Montgomery, Roanoke and Franklin.
 
The 42-inch-diameter, buried, high-pressure pipeline would transport natural gas that has been extracted through hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” from Marcellus and Utica shale formations in West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Ohio.
 
Virginia law, specifically 56-49.01, allows a natural gas company to survey property without an owner’s permission. That is true as long as the company has taken the mandated steps for alerting the owner before entering the property.
 
According to the law, such entry “shall not be deemed a trespass.”
 
Natalie Cox, a spokeswoman for Mountain Valley, said that the joint venture is confident that the relevant Virginia law grants the legal authority to access property for surveying without permission.
 
Cox also said Mountain Valley would much rather have an owner’s OK than pursue “the absolute last resort” of entering the property without consent.
 
Meanwhile, Dominion Transmission, a partner with Duke Energy and others in the proposed 550-mile-long Atlantic Coast Pipeline, recently alerted property owners along that natural gas pipeline’s possible route who have refused access for surveying that it will sue them in court, if necessary, to gain access by Virginia law.
 
Cox said Monday that Mountain Valley and its right-of-way acquisition contractor, Oklahoma-based Coates Field Service, have contacted about 1,725 property owners to date along the proposed route to request access for study and surveying to obtain a possible easement. That tally includes about 1,025 property owners in West Virginia.
 
She said that about 82 percent of landowners contacted have granted permission for survey work.
 
The Mountain Valley Pipeline would be an interstate natural gas line, which means that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission would determine whether the pipeline should be built and, if so, would oversee its construction and operations.
 
Mountain Valley has begun the “pre-filing” process with FERC and anticipates submitting a formal application to the commission during the fall of 2015.
Mountain Valley has said it hopes to begin construction in late 2016 and have the pipeline in service by the fourth quarter of 2018.
 
A FERC-published guide for people whose property might be targeted for a pipeline route addresses the issue of a pipeline company or its contractor coming on the property without permission: “State or local trespass laws prevail until a certificate is issued by the commission.”
FERC’s guide explains that pipeline companies must conduct environmental studies before filing an application and, as a result, “will try to obtain access to all of the proposed right-of-way” in advance of that application.
 
John Johns, executive director of the Virginia Sheriffs’ Association, said the association has not yet addressed how sheriffs might respond to a report of trespassing.
 
“My initial thought is that one of the sheriffs may need to request an attorney general’s opinion,” Johns said. “That research would take into consideration the thoughts of Mr. Waldo and anyone else who might weigh in.”
 
Michael Kelly, a spokesman for Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring, said Monday that he is not aware of a request for a related opinion but noted that such requests “are treated as attorney-client privileged communication” before an opinion is issued.
 
Opponents of the pipeline have voiced a host of concerns about its potent
effect on the environment, public safety and property values.
 
Meanwhile, representatives from Mountain Valley Pipeline are scheduled to meet Thursday at 6:30 p.m. with Giles County’s board of supervisors at Giles High School in Pearisburg. The meeting is public.

Deborah Ferruccio will be appearing in court at the Wake County Justice Center in Raleigh / Community Open Houses: MVP project




Comments:  There are many issues we are facing in our region. We can respond as Americans and exercise and demand our rights as guaranteed under the Constitution; or roll over and play dead...even worse...DUMB. You have the ability to affect change because we live in America,. Do it.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rlxj_2efhhU

Please view this extremely important video. On Tuesday, November 18, 2014, at 9:00 am, Deborah Ferruccio will be appearing in court at the Wake County Justice Center in Raleigh. On June 2, she was arrested and charged with 2nd Degree Trespassing at the State Capitol while delivering a message to Governor McCrory and NC legislators concerning the crucial need for a comprehensive cleanup of Duke Energy's February coal ash disaster. She's appearing in court while Duke Energy is sending toxic coal ash to landfills which will leak into water resources of additional communities.

BREDL suggests a solution. http://www.bredl.org/pdf4/Coal_ash_report_14-083_w_Appx_A+B.pdf

If initiated, and coal ash was stored on Duke Energy's property,liability would remain with Duke Energy and not to another community with a lined landfill which would eventually leak.

 Thank you, Deborah.





Community Open Houses:  MVP project

As an important stakeholder and community member, we want to keep you informed of the proposed schedule, as well as provide ways for you to stay engaged throughout the various stages of the MVP project. On October 31, 2014 the FERC approved our use of the pre-filing process and assigned a project docket number of PF15-3.
As part of our outreach efforts, we will host community open houses to introduce, discuss, and answer questions regarding the proposed MVP project. This is your opportunity to meet with members of the MVP project team, as well as talk with FERC representatives. You are invited to attend any of the community open houses as scheduled:


 Dates of MPV meetings are below. Please see the attachment for the letter from MPV.Monday, December 15, 2014 Tuesday, December 16, 20145:30 - 8:00 PM 5:30 - 8:00 PM Hampton Inn Gretna/Alta Vista/Chatham Harvester Performance Center 200 McBride Lane 450 Franklin Street Gretna, VA 24557 Rocky Mount, VA 24151Wednesday, December 17, 2014 Thursday, December 18, 20145:30 - 8:00 PM 5:30 - 8:00 PM Salem Civic Center Days Inn Blacksburg Conference Center 1001 Roanoke Boulevard 3503 Holiday Lane Salem, VA 24153 Blacksburg, VA 24060Monday, January 12, 2015 January 13, 20155:30 - 8:00 PM 5:30 - 8:00 PM Pearisburg Community Center Gymnasium Lindside United Methodist Church, Family Life Center 1410 Wenonah Ave. 8764 Seneca Trail South Pearisburg, VA 24134 Lindside, WV 24951Wednesday, January 14, 2015 Thursday, January 15, 20155:30 - 8:00 PM 5:30 - 8:00 PM Summers County Courthouse Rupert Community Center 120 Ballengee St. 557 Nicholas St. Hinton, WV 25951 Rupert, WV 25984Tuesday, January 20, 2015 Wednesday, January, 21 20155:30 - 8:00 PM 5:30 - 8:00 PM Summersville Arena & Conference Center Webster Springs Municipal Building 3 Armory Way 146 McGraw Avenue Summersville, WV 26651 Webster Springs, WV 26288Thursday, January 22, 2015 Monday, January, 26 20155:30 - 8:00 PM 5:30 - 8:00 PM Burnsville Community Center Plantation Inn & Suites 237 Kanawha St. 1322 Hackers Creek Rd. Burnsville, WV 26335 Jane Lew, WV 26378Tuesday, January 27, 2015 Wednesday, January 28 20155:30 - 8:00 PM 5:30 - 8:00 PM Progressive Women's Association (Old YWCA) Jacksonburg Fire Department 305 Washington Avenue 93 Buffalo Run Rd. Clarksburg, WV 26330 Jacksonburg, WV 26377

http://mountainvalleypipeline.info/open-houses-2/
 
Subject: Important Community Meetings

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Franklin County Pipeline Community Meetings

 

November 18th

1:30 PM Franklin County Government Center, Rocky Mount Virginia
Board of Supervisors Meeting:  Mara Robbins from the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League will briefly comment on opposition to the pipeline.  It will take very little time for you to come out at 1:30 and show support!  (If you would like to comment on the board of supervisors meetings, they require you to register at least 1 week in advance.  PLEASE do this - the more of us who voice our concerns the better!)


November 24th

6 PM Rocky Mount Public Library
Are you interested in what you can do to volunteer to help stop the pipeline? Come to this meeting, and we will start making plans.  We will be electing a board so we can become a non-profit and vote on whether or not we want to join the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League.  BREDL will provide legal protections and non-profit status if we join.

 

December 4th

7 PM Redwood United Methodist Church
Come to this fun meeting where we will write letters, win prizes, and bid on awesome auction items which will help us to STOP THE PIPELINE!  If you would like to donate an auction item or a prize, email me.

 

December 16th

5:30 PM The Harvester Performance Center
The Mountain Valley Pipeline PR Reps will be at the Harvester to answer any questions.  Let's all come prepared with our firm arguments and anti-pipeline signs.

Surveyors are in the area!

If you see surveyors, let us know where they are by emailing us.  Document any interactions you have with them.  Recording everything they say is the best method.  It's legal in the state of Virginia to record conversations as long as one person knows about the recording.  Surveyors ARE NOT LEGALLY ALLOWED on people's properties.  There are big legal battles being fought on this right now.  IF you are an affected landowner, we recommend you get legal help.  Read this interesting article about eminent domain.  This project has not been approved by FERC so the surveyors do not have legal rights to be on your property.  

Don't forget to file with FERC.

The most effective act you can do right now is to file your opposition with FERC (the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission).  Instructions are here.  

Signs

If you want a sign that looks like the header of this email, contact us.  Suggested donation is $5 but if you don't have the money, we still want you to have a sign, so ask!
If you want to volunteer, come to the meetings, or please email us.
For up to the minute updates, join us on the Preserve Franklin Facebook Page.